Posts Tagged ‘Eberron’


I sit down with Jeff Greiner, Sam Dillon, Tracy Hurley, and Liz Theis to discuss Gen Con‘s reaction to the Indiana religious freedom law and the delay of fifth edition Dungeons and Dragons conversion guides. After that I interview Eberron campaign setting and Gloom card game creator Keith Baker to discuss the Kickstarter for his new card based RPG Phoenix: Dawn Command. This podcast was recorded on April 7 and 8, 2015.

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Get ready for war. On Sunday, March 29th at 7:30PM Eastern John Fischer DMs Allison Rossi, Rudy BassoAlex Basso, and me in a massive battle of the elements. Using the new Dungeons & Dragons Unearthed Arcana Battlesystem, Unearthed Arcana Eberron racesElemental Evil Player’s Companion this will be a livestreamed D&D encounter like no other!

You can watch it here: http://www.twitch.tv/the_tome_show

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Join the crew from The Tome Show‘s Round Table podcast as we playtest these new D&D rules. The video will live on The Tome Show’s Twitch site, the audio of the encounter will be released as a podcast on thetomeshow.com, and the crew will breakdown what they think of the new rules in a Round Table podcast at a later date.

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If you like what you’re reading, please check out my podcasts on The Tome Show, follow me on Twitter, tell your friends and share this blog post, and/or leave me a comment and let me know you think. Thanks!


I sit down with Vegas Lancaster, Dave Gibson, Sam Dillon, and Jeff Greiner to talk about some recent layoffs on the D&D team at Wizards of the Coast and the Unearthed Arcana 5e Eberron update. This podcast was recorded on February 5, 2015.

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I sit down with Jeff Greiner, Sam Dillon, Greg Blair, and Dave Gibson to speculate what the next setting might be in the official D&D fifth edition rules. We discuss Forgotten Realms, Eberron, Dragonlance, Greyhawk, Ravenloft, Dark Sun, Planescape, Mystara, and more. This podcast was recorded on December 16, 2014.

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If you like what you’re reading please follow me on Twitter, check out my other podcasts, Bonus Action and Gamer to Gamer, tell your friends, and/or leave me a comment and let me know you think. Thanks!

James Introcaso sits down with Keith Baker, creator of the Eberron campaign setting, Gloom card game, novelist, and game designer to talk about the games he’s playing, his career, and his soon-to-be-launched Kickstarter for an entirely new RPG from his company, Twogether Studios. This podcast was recorded on December 9, 2014.

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Everything has fallen apart. Jaela Daran is dead. Bel Shalor is free. It’s all your fault. The Silver Flame burns no more. You have started the apocalypse.

That is how epic tier began for the players of my fourth edition Eberron game. How did the 20 previous levels of adventuring get them there? Read on, and I’ll show you my method of making big plot twists pay off. This post is inspired by this month’s RPG Blog Carnival theme, With a Twist. It was chosen by Mike Bourke over at Campaign Mastery. Thanks for a great topic and for hosting, Mike!

The Campaign

My Eberron campaign was full of twists, turns, backstabs, betrayals, and secrets. The PCs were wrapped up in so many schemes it was difficult for them to know friend from foe, even amongst their own party ranks. Eberron is perfect for this kind of game, since Keith Baker designed his world with plenty of spies, terrors, and hanging story threads for DMs and players to yank on.

The main arc of my game for the first 20 levels involved the mystery surrounding the Day of Mourning. If you’re unfamiliar with Eberron, one of its mysteries is that an entire country was enveloped in a deadly magic mist, killing millions and creating monstrosities which are still active in the borders of the mist-shrouded wasteland now called The Mournland. No one knows what caused this disaster, but there are several options. In my game I chose to have the events on the Day of Mourning caused by the test of a doomsday device gone horribly wrong. The adventurers slowly discovered the plot and exposed the subsequent coverup. Eventually they gathered all of the scattered pieces of this device before rival and enemy factions might. That’s how things went bad for them.

The adventurers all cast themselves as agents of the Church of the Silver Flame (think Dark Ages Catholic Church). The Church, which also has an entire country and army under its power, worships a literal silver fire, which burns at the site of a showdown between the paladin Tira Miron and the demon lord Bel Shalor. The Silver Flame itself is said to be the soul of Tira Miron (and her couatl ally) who gave her life to bind Bel Shalor in the plane of Khyber. As long as the flame burns the demon lord cannot break free of his prison.

Imagine the adventurers’ shock and horror when they realized their own actions extinguished the Silver Flame and set Bel Shalor free.

Set Up

In order for a twist to pay off, it shouldn’t come out of the blue. A good twist should be something the players don’t see coming, but also gives answers to one or more unanswered questions. Past moments of the campaign that didn’t make sense will suddenly click into focus. Lay the ground work early for your twist. Good twists are not just surprising, they’re rewarding. There should be an “It all makes sense!” or “We should have seen this coming!” moment.

My twist had its groundwork laid in the first session. Bel Shalor was imprisoned, but his right hand was free – a rakshasa called Durastoran the Wyrmbreaker. The party encountered this lore early in their adventuring days since they and their patron, Cardinal Gaffin, were members of the Church where the story is common knowledge. They knew that Bel Shalor, though imprisoned could still speak to people of the material world, though he could not otherwise influence it directly. Rakshasa are shape shifters, so Durastoran could be anyone.

Bel Shalor himself contacted each of the PCs at least once, usually pretending to be the voice of the Silver Flame giving divine orders. He even convinced two PCs to do multiple evil deeds for what was seemingly a greater good.

Other hints of Bel Shalor rising came here and there throughout the campaign. Symbols of his cult were found in dungeons and settlements, suggesting his followers had become more active. A blind orc soothsayer told the players to abandon their current path and help him prevent a great evil from rising. They put his idea on hold because they saw their immediate help needed elsewhere, planning on coming back to him later. When they did try to find the orc, they found that he had been murdered. Clues like these were peppered everywhere.

Perhaps one of the most baffling things that happened to the PCs during those first 20 levels was that followers of Bel Shalor appeared in one of the characters’ most desperate moments and offered them aid. Though wary, the PCs accepted this help since it came during a time when the alternative was death.

All of these hints made the actual moment of the twist more than a WTF moment. It was a moment that was able to answer many big questions at once and satisfy some story threads while exposing entirely new ones.

Now you’d think all these threads would make players think, “Oh man we have to investigate all this Bel Shalor stuff!” but as I noted above the players had far more pressing concerns and were caught in the middle of a tangled web of politics, deceit, and war.

Distraction

One reason the players didn’t discover the twist in my campaign until the appropriate time was because their minds were elsewhere. There were more immediate concerns in their lives and the world than dealing with Bel Shalor (or so they thought). Keeping your players busy will keep the hints you drop just hints as they deal with threats everywhere and navigate a treacherous landscape.

As I mentioned above, my players were racing to find out what happened on The Day of Mourning and then gathering the pieces of the device which caused it. Why were they racing? Because other people wanted this device to use for their own nefarious purposes. In Eberron their are large merchant houses who were looking to lay hands on the device, some to keep their involvement in actual events covered up, others to use it themselves, there were rival governments looking to recover the device, radical factions within the Church, and terrorist organizations who wanted the doomsday weapon for obvious reasons.

So this race took up a lot of the PCs’ time and resources. Add into this numerous side quests and each PC’s individual character backstory quests and their plates were full. “Who cares that Bel Shalor’s followers saved our lives? We’ll investigate it once we have this device in hand.”

One of the distractions.

Trust

Often a twist involves a betrayal or at least the unexpected action of one NPC (or PC). Just watch Game of ThronesArrow, or almost any serialized genre television show and you’ll see what I mean. Characters drive the action of stories. If the world just blew up for no reason other than it was time for the world to blow up, that’d be surprising, but it would be unsatisfying. If the world blows up because an NPC put it into motion ages ago and secretly had the characters helping him or her along the way, well that’s a very satisfying twist. In order for that particular twist to work, the PCs really had to trust the right NPC.

With so many spies and sneaky NPCs in my Eberron campaign, it was difficult for my characters to know who to trust. Yet, there was one person they trusted – their patron, Cardinal Gaffin. From the beginning, Cardinal Gaffin showed himself to be a friend to the players and a good person. He saved their lives several times with valuable information, exposed spies within the Church, educated and warned the PCs about their enemies, and put himself at risk for the adventurers. He trusted them and eventually they returned this trust. It was evident they did since they broke him out of a super secure prison and then helped him become the High Cardinal in the Church. It’s easy to achieve mutual trust in the players’ minds with all that life saving going on. Gaffin was their rock of trustworthiness.

It was very convient for me when they went to Gaffin and asked him to create a special ritual so they could hide all the pieces of the doomsday weapon they were gathering in a secret extradimensional space. No one would have access to these pieces accept for the party… and Gaffin because he designed the ritual of course.

Challenges

Turning challenges into weaknesses is easier said than done, but when it comes to a big plot twist, you’re going to come up against challenges, especially if you’re dropping hints for your players. Remember that as the DM with a little creativity, you can turn challenges to advantages for your twist.

The biggest challenge of pulling of a twist like this is tracking everything that’s happening in your game and making sure your players are still in control and driving things. The worst thing that can happen to your twist is you railroading your players into it. When the PCs decided they wanted to look at the activities of Bel Shalor more closely, I allowed them to do it, but I made sure their other enemies kept working to recover pieces of the doomsday device. This kept the PCs from looking too deep. It was a chance for them to uncover a few more clues and also a chance for me to add in even more distractions. As I mentioned two of my PCs were unwittingly working with the demon lord and the rest of the party uncovered this in their investigation. This caused party in-fighting which pulled their focus from the big twist that was coming.

Then there are, of course, the bookkeeping challenges of keeping track of the your different threads. Regularly emailing your players updates, keeping a lot of Google docs, using software like Realm Works, or using a website like Obsidian Portal help you keep your story organized. They’re quick, easy, and you can even have the players help you out.

Payoff

Finally, savor your payoff when the moment arrives. Lean into it, believe in it, have fun, and your players will too. If you’ve set everything up well your players’ minds will be blown when the reveal occurs and they’ll be hungry to know what happens next. It should play out like the end of a great season of television.

My payoff was, of course, that Cardinal Gaffin was actually Durastouran the Wyrmbreaker. Once the players had assembled all the pieces of the doomsday weapon, which caused massive magical phenomena, Gaffin threw a banquet in their honor. During the banquet, he stayed behind and turned on the device which extinguished the Silver Flame and set Bel Shalor free. As the PCs arrived on scene they were able to teleport the device into The Abyss before it did too much damage, but they were not yet strong enough to take on the already free demon lord and had to regroup and gather new allies. The players loved the twist and the stage was now set for the epic tier of the campaign.

If you like what you’re reading, please check out my podcasts on The Tome Show, follow me on Twitter, tell your friends, share this blog post, and/or leave me a comment and let me know you think. Thanks!


I sit down with Jeff Greiner, Sam Dillon, Liz Theis, and Dave Gibson to talk about the latest Dungeon Master’s Guide previews and a recent Mike Mearls Reddit AMA. This podcast was recorded on November 13, 2014.

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If you like what you’re reading please follow me on Twitter, check out my other podcast Gamer to Gamer, tell your friends, and/or leave me a comment and let me know you think. Thanks!

A new episode of my podcast, The Round Table, is up on The Tome Show’s website.

I sit down with Alex Basso, Topher Kohan, and Round Table newbie Enrique Bertran (aka Newbie DM) to talk about previews from the Dungeon Master’s Guide related to the Wizards of the Coast participation in Extra Life. The conversation doesn’t stop there, we then talk about the possibility of the Eberron campaign setting being brought into the fifth edition rules. This podcast was recorded on October 21, 2014.

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newbiedm.com

Topher’s Google+ Page

If you like what you’re reading please follow me on Twitter, check out my other podcast Gamer to Gamer, tell your friends, and/or leave me a comment and let me know you think. Thanks!

So I’ve already written quite a bit about some of the races available to my players in Exploration Age – the assimar in one post and the deva, mul, and shardmind in another. Yet, I’ve got more yet to be released D&D races I’m going to make available to them and I’d like to give you the mechanics I’ve created as well as the unique story for each race in my setting.

Svirfneblin

First up, the svirfneblin. They’re actually a gnome subrace, so bust out that Player’s Handbook, and check out the gnome. I’ve given you the deep gnome story in another post, so check that out if you want their story. Here are the mechanics.

Svirfneblin Traits

Deep gnomes are weird.

Ability Score Increase. Your Wisdom score increases by 1.

Superior Darkvision. Your darkvision has a radius of 120 feet.

Sunlight Sensitivity. You have disadvantage on attack rolls and on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight when you, the target of your attack, or whatever you are trying to perceive is in direct sunlight.

Stonecunning. Whenever you make an Intelligence (History) check related to the origin of stonework, you are considered proficient in the History skill and add double your proficiency bonus to the check, instead of your normal proficiency bonus.

Svrifneblin Combat Training. You have proficiency with the war pick and warhammer.

Svirfneblin Lights. You know the dancing lights cantrip. Intelligence is your spellcasting ability for this spell.

Duergar

Mohawk duergar is the best.

Living with the drow and fighting side-by-side in their constant war with the aberrants are the duergar, or gray dwarves. Like their surface kin the gray dwarves value martial prowess and good well-crafted. This is, of course, because the duergar descended from their surface kin a long time ago. During their bloody war with the chromatic dragons on the side of the shardminds, some dwarves went into The Underdark seeking refuge. These dwarves became the duergar and eventually found an entirely new war beneath the surface.

Now, in many ways duergar have more in common with drow than they do with dwarves of the world above. Both duergar and drow deal with the constant stress of their aberrant war and rely on each other with undying trust.

While they share brotherhood and battlelines with the drow, duergar do not share their drow’s impulsiveness and live-each-day-as-if-it-were-your-last lifestyle. Almost everything the duergar do is in preparation for war. Duergar are practical and know that a good night’s sleep and healthy meal are more likely than a late night of revelry at ensuring survival the next day. They craft arms and armor, mine metals, and train constantly. Ever vigilant, careful, and calculating are the gray dwarves.

Duergar adventurers could be mercenaries seeking a better life on the surface, aberrant hunters hoping to learn new techniques to help them with their war below, deadly assassins for hire, or anything you dream.

Duergar Traits

Ability Score Increase. Your Wisdom score increases by 1.

Superior Darkvision. Your dark vision has a radius of 120 feet.

Sunlight Sensitivity. You have disadvantage on attack rolls and on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on sight when you, the target of your attack, or whatever you are trying to perceive is in direct sunlight.

Duergar Magic. You know the thaumaturgy cantrip. When you reach 3rd level, you can cast the invisibility spell once per day. When you reach 5th level, you can also cast the enlarge spell once per day, but you may only target yourself with the spell. Wisdom is your spellcasting ability for these spells.

Shifter

Don’t mess.

Shifters are born outcasts. Many are killed as babes, their parents too horrified to look upon them. To the elves they are abhorrent monstrosities. To the werewolves – an evolutionary misstep deserving only to die. Many of the shifters lucky enough to have a parent let them live are still kicked out of the house at an early age, or orphaned when their parent is murdered by bigots.

These abandoned shifters find each other and form communities of wandering vagabonds who make a living performing, swindling, and selling crafts. These communities exist all over Findalay and many look forward to the circuses and carnivals the shifters provide. Others feel shifters have been short-changed and try to help these beings find a more established life in Findalay. Some fear the partial werewolf race avoiding and shunning them. The truly fearful seek out and kill these half-breeds.

The discovery of Verda has opened up new possibilities for the shifters, a place where they may have a home of their own free from persecution, stares, jeers, discrimination, violence, and the ever-looming Brotherhood of the Moon.

Shifter adventurers could be thieves disguised as traveling circus performers, cunning mages using their magic to predict people’s fortunes, wild, untamed barbarians, or anything you dream.

Shifter Traits

Ability Score Increase. Your Wisdom score increases by 1.

Age. Shifters mature and age at the same rate as humans.

Alignment. When it comes to good or evil, shifters are usually neutral, since they embody the spirit of the wild. Most shifters tend to be wild and free and therefore favor chaos over law.

Size. Shifters range from just over 5 to just over 6 feet tall and have lean builds. Your size is Medium.

Speed. Your base walking speed is 30 feet.

Darkvision. Thanks to your lycanthrope heritage, you have superior vision in dark and dim conditions. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.

Keen Hearing and Smell. You have advantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on hearing or smell.

Languages. You can speak, read, and write Common and one other language of your choice.

Subrace. Two subraces of shifter are found in Canus: longtooth and razorclaw. Choose one of these sub races.

Longtooth Shifter

Ability Score Increase. Your Strength score increases by 2.

Longtooth Shifting. Once per day, as a bonus action you may shift, entering a more beastial state for one minute. When you do, you gain a +2 damage bonus to Strength-based attacks and regenerate 5 HP at the start of your turns. In addition, you grow long fangs which function as a light weapon which deals 1d6 piercing damage. You may attack with your fangs as a bonus action on your turn.

While you are shifting, you may not cast spells. You can end the shift early on your turn if you so choose.

You gain a second daily use of longtooth shifting at 8th level and your bonus damage to Strength-based attacks while shifting increases to +4, and your attacks with your fangs count as magic for the purpose of overcoming damage resistance. You gain a third daily use of this ability at 16th level and your bonus damage to Strength-based attacks while shifting increases to +6.

Razorclaw Shifter

Ability Score Increase. Your Dexterity score increases by 2.

Razorclaw Shifting. Once per day, as a bonus action you may shift, entering a more beastial state for one minute. When you do, your speed increases by five feet, you gain a +1 bonus to your AC, and you have advantage on Dexterity saving throws. In addition, you grow a pair of claws which function as light, finesse melee weapons which deal 1d6 slashing damage. You may attack with one of your claws as a bonus action on your turn.

While you are shifting, you may not cast spells. You can end the shift early on your turn if you so choose.

You gain a second daily use of razorclaw shifting at 8th level and your speed increases by 10 feet, you attacks with your claws count as magic weapons for the purpose of overcoming damage resistance, and your bonus to AC increases to +2 while shifting. You gain a third daily use of this ability at 16th level and your speed increases by 15 feet and your bonus to AC increases to +3 while shifting.

If you like what you’re reading, please check out my podcast on The Tome Show, follow me on Twitter, tell your friends and share this blog post, and/or leave me a comment and let me know you think. Thanks!

I love strange fantasy races. The more bizarre the better. The grognards may shake their heads at shardmind, kalashtar, and dragonborn, but I say bring them on and keep them coming!

So needless to say I was a little disappointed, though not wholly unsurprised when I saw this list of Player’s Handbook races tweeted out by Wizards of the Coast last week.

I need some more weird!

I need some more weird!

Time to Steal

I’ve written about my good habit of stealing ideas from those smarter than I. My favorite fantasy races are not the elf and dwarf (though I do enjoy a playing pointy eared or bearded PC from time to time). My favorites are the warforged, mul, genasi, and other races of setting specific campaigns. So I say, why not steal them for my own game if I love them so much? Yeah! Why not?

Well, many of these races are specific D&D licensed property, meaning they are the original intellectual property of the company, meaning they were made by D&D for D&D (unlike elves, dwarves, orcs, and more which existed before D&D came along). That means they most-likely won’t be covered in the forthcoming OGL. That means I probably shouldn’t put them in products I’m planning on selling, like the Exploration Age Campaign Guide.

However, it does not mean that I can’t incorporate these races into my home game or include them in a FREE supplement for folks who want to play a game in Exploration Age… Hmm…

Incorporating the Bizarre Races

Here’s my way of incorporating some of the more unusual PC races into the story of Exploration Age. I’ve already written about the shifters and warforged, but here are some others. Their behavior and ecology may differ from their original settings in order to bring them into Canus, but I tried to keep the heart and soul of the races intact. I want a thri-kreen to still feel like a thri-kreen.

At some point, I’ll be creating mechanics for these races, but this post is all about making the races of other settings work in your story. This is just a taste.

Kalashtar

Like their githzerai parents, kalashtar are calm and contemplative, and like their human parents, inquisitive and curious. Such a combination marks these rare humanoids as ripe for a life of adventure.

Kalashtar serve a vital role in the tribes. Often they act as emissaries, carrying a chief’s message across the neighboring lands, or as neutral mediators, negotiating peace between two warring tribes. Kalashtar often break off on their own when they come of age, hoping to see all that Canus has to offer. More than any other race, they are willing to travel to West Canus. The furtive stares and pointed questions of the locals do not bother them, since the Kalashtar are just as eager to stare and question them back.

Kalashtar adventurers could be druids wandering the wider world cataloging all manner of flora and fauna, mages studying the origin of magic, paladins who believe all life is beautiful and worthy of protection, or anything you dream.

Muls

If half-elves are rare in Exploration Age, then muls are practically unknown. These half-human, half-dwarves are met with pity, fear, and disrespect across West Canus. Mul struggle and often fail to find belonging among either their human or dwarven kin. Like half-elves, this not-so-subtle poly-ethnic persecution is at the heart of their racial identity.

In Bragonay, muls are not brought into the caste system. They are treated as outsiders and have no access to the services of the region. Unlike Kalashtar, these half-dwarves, do feel the burn of the many eyes that glare at them with suspicion. As a result, they speak little and do all they can to blend into the crowd. However, muls are not pushovers. They end conflict swiftly, usually with a harsh word or solid hit to the mouth.

The life of a mul is usually one of lonely wandering. They are occasionally accepted by bands of half-elves and could live a more stable life in Marrial or somewhere in Verda. For the most part muls serve as self-taught mercenaries and thieves, making their living off their strength and resilience.

Mul adventurers could be wandering thieves, battle-hardened professional fighters, demolitions experts, or anything you dream.

Shardmind

If you like weird, you’ll love the shardmind.

Amongst the rare races of Canus, sharmind are the most uncommon. These crystalline beings were created long ago by the chromatic dragons of West Canus. No more have been made since the shardminds rose up against their creators. Despite their infinite life-spans, many met their ends in that uprising, and throughout the millennia others have fallen admist adventures and battle. This dying breed is made up of wandering hermits, secluded scholars, and nihilistic daredevils.

The shardminds alive today have forgotten more years than most other humanoid races have lived. Some shardmind let their long lives fuel them, diving into research and training to hone their abilities and become the best they can be at a particular discipline. Others have given up and now seek a glorious death in an adventure. They want to go out of this meaningless life in an explosive finale, often battling against their most hated foe – chromatic dragons.

Contemplative, quiet, and patient are the virtues of these crystalline people. Shardminds are often loners, and many members of other races go their entire lives without ever seeing one. Unless they are adventuring with a party, they tend to avoid populated areas and make their homes in the wilderness so they might be alone with their thoughts and projects.

Sharmind adventurers could be scholarly mages unlocking the secrets of the universe, fighters seeking their glorious end, hermit clerics who have tapped into the power of the divine, or anything you dream.

Svirfneblin

Deep gnomes, or svirfneblin, live with the drow and duergar of Quatus. They share the same brotherhood and loyalty of these peoples but they have something the too-practical duergar and devil-may-care drow lack – a sense of hope. While duergar have accepted their war with the aberrants as eternal and the dark elves bury the issue with partying, the deep gnomes believe that someday they could beat the aberrants. The svirfneblin have not lost sight of what makes life worth living.

Deep gnomes work hard; they are tinkerers and inventors who love working the stone and metals of The Underdark. They take great comfort in spending time with family and friends, drinking good tea, and eating good food. They understand the complex and take joy in the simple. The gray dwarves would say the svirfneblin are naive, while the drow would say they are too boring, but there is a reason all three of these races live together. In the darkest hours of Quatus, the hope that the svirfneblin provide is infectious to the other races of the war-torn country.

Amongst the people of the surface, svirfneblin are met with kindness. They are honest merchants and well-mannered diplomats, but they do not often serve in these rolls since they can be easily pushed around since they are too willing to trust. A deep gnome merchant is usually a good thing for a consumer looking to make a dishonest deal.

Svirfneblin adventurers could be crafty rogues, curious tinkerers, mages out to end the aberrant threat for good, or anything you dream.

Thri-kreen

GIANT BUG-PEOPLE! Badass!

Thri-kreen tribes have been stalking The Sprawling Jungle of Verda for as long as humans have been on Canus. These bellicose humanoids answer almost any threat or annoyance with battle. Thri-kreen are bitter toward enemies, suspicious of outsiders, and take extreme all-or-nothing solutions to most problems. However they are also loyal allies and friends.

Thri-kreen enjoy battle and take pleasure in the thrill of placing one’s life on the line. To them, the best and most honorable death is one that comes from an enemy blade. The strongest warriors are always the chiefs of their tribes. Thri-kreen are taught the ways of battle from the time they are little. Even when a thri-kreen tribe isn’t at war, it trains with other tribes and within its own people. Thri-kreen warriors and mages fight one another for entertainment, an activity which guests of the tribe are expected to join. Other than battle and the study of war, thri-kreen take pleasure in nature. They find it peaceful to commune with plants and animals after a long battle and are taught the names and behaviors of all the all that lives within the jungle.

Thri-kreen treat most other races suspiciously, particularly folk foreign to Verda. Their trust is hard to earn and usually won through battle. Once that relationship is earned, thri-kreen will die for their friends.

Thri-kreen adventurers could be honorable barbarians, wise druid shamans, fierce rangers defending the jungle, or anything you dream.

If you like what you’re reading, please check out my podcast on The Tome Show, follow me on Twitter, tell your friends and share this blog post, and/or leave me a comment and let me know you think. Thanks!