Posts Tagged ‘Chase’

I’ve had a very crazy, but wonderful week. My 30th birthday was on Friday last week and all weekend I got to celebrate with amazing friends and family. All this week I was fortunate to be busy with work for the one-man video production company I run. I scored a freelance RPG writing job I’ve been working on (more details to come as publications are… well, published). Oh and I’m moving to another state on Saturday. Needless to say, this week was busy.

As much as I’d like to have a big robust update for you, I’m afraid it’s not so huge this time. I do have a nice swamp chase complication table for you below. As many of you know I’m fond of chase sequences at the table. The fifth edition Dungeon Master’s Guide has introduced some great chase mechanics for DMs to use in their Dungeons and Dragons games. I’ve had an article published about running chase sequences in EN World EN5ider Magazine which you can read if you pledge a single dollar a month to the Patreon campaign (though I recommend you contribute another buck or two to get their sweet adventures and more). On this very blog I’ve posted the sewers and treetop city chase complication tables.

All that’s to say here’s what I got for you today. Enjoy!

Swamp Chase Complications

d20 Complication
1 You run into waist-deep water. Make a DC 10 Strength (Athletics) check. On a failure the water counts as 15 feet of difficult terrain.
2 A mud pit is before you. You can attempt to clear it with a DC 15 Strength (Athletics) check or spend 10 feet of movement to go around the pit. On a failure you sink into the deep mud and it counts as 15 feet of difficult terrain.
3 You disturb a nest of stirges. 2d4 stirges chase after you.
4 You must run across a twisted tree to cross a small chasm. Make a DC 15 Dexterity (Acrobatics). On a failure you fall 1d4 times 5 feet, land prone, and take fall damage as normal.
5 An assassin vine tries to grab you around the neck. Make a DC 15 Dexterity. On a failure the vine grabs you and you take 2d6 points of bludgeoning damage. You are grappled by the vine until you succeed on a DC 10 Strength (Athletics) check which you make as an action or the vine holding you is dealt 10 points of damage (AC 12).
6 You run into a lizardfolk. Make a DC 15 Charisma (Intimidation) check. On a failure the lizardfolk chases after you.
7 You run across a puddle of stagnant water and splash some into your mouth. You must make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw. On a failure you become poisoned for 1 minute.
8 You run through a nest of biting insects. The insects make an attack roll against you and get a +5 bonus to the roll. On a hit they deal 1d12 piercing damage to you.
9 You run onto soft earth. If you do not use your action to dash this round, make a DC 15 Athletics check. On a failure you sink into the mud and cannot move until you spend 20 feet of movement to climb out.
10 A pit of snakes blocks your path. You can spend 10 feet of movement to go around the pit or make a DC 15 Dexterity (Acrobatics) check to swing from a vine. On a failure you fall into the pit and take 1d8 piercing damage and 1d8 damage. It costs 15 feet of movement to get out of the pit.
11 – 20 No complication.

PDFs

Would you like this chase complication table in a PDF by itself or along with all the other fifth edition D&D chase complications I’ve designed for this blog? Grab one below.

Swamp Chase Complications Table

Chase Complication Tables

If you don’t want to grab them now, but decide you want the PDFs at a future date, head on over to the Free Game Resources section of this site where the documents will live along with monstersmagic items, backgroundsD&D fifth edition rules modulesspellsadventures, and more created by yours truly.

If you like what you’re reading, please check out my podcasts on The Tome Show, follow me on Twitter, tell your friends and share this blog post, and/or leave me a comment and let me know you think. Thanks!

I’m fond of chase sequences. The fifth edition Dungeon Master’s Guide has introduced some great chase mechanics for DMs to use in their Dungeons and Dragons games. I’ve had an article published about running chase sequences in EN World EN5ider Magazine which you can read if you pledge a single dollar a month to the Patreon campaign (though I recommend you contribute another buck or two to get their sweet adventures and more). On this very blog I’ve posted the sewers and treetop city chase complication tables. Today I want to add a few new complication tables to the mix, but they’re beyond the usual foot race. I’m talking about chases up in the sky and through water. Below are chase complication tables for a flying chase and saltwater chase.

Flying Chase Complications
d20 Complication
1 A massive gust of wind blows against you. Make a DC 15 Strength saving throw. On a failure, the wind pushes you back 10 feet at the start of your turn.
2 A flock of birds blocks your path. Make a DC 15 Dexterity (Acrobatics) check. On a failure, the birds count as 15 feet of difficult terrain and you take 1d10 piercing damage.
3 Suddenly the air around you becomes very thin. Make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw. On a failure you suffer one level of exhaustion which lasts until the end of the chase.
4 You pass by a giant eagle. Make a DC 15 Wisdom (Animal Handling) check. On a failure the eagle joins the chase and chases after you with hostile intentions.
5 A random atmospheric disturbance occurs around you. Make a DC 15 Dexterity saving. On a failure you are hit by a small jolt of lightning and take 4d6 lightning damage.
6 A cloud is in your path. Make a DC 10 Strength (Athletics) check or use 10 feet of movement to move around the cloud. On a failure the cloud counts as 10 feet of difficult terrain and you are vulnerable to lightning damage until the end of the chase or until you take fire damage.
7 A passing peryton decides to make a meal out of you and joins the chase.
8 You fly into a weak magic zone. If you are using magic to fly, make a DC 15 Intelligence (Arcana) check. On a failure you hover in the air and cannot move by means of magical flight until the start of your next turn.
9 A random atmospheric disturbance occurs around you. Make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. On a failure you take 1d6 thunder damage and are pushed 10 feet in a random direction determined by the DM.
10 Violent winds assault you. Make a DC 10 Strength (Athletics) check. On a failure you are moved 15 feet in a random direction (determined by the DM).
11 – 20 No complication.
Saltwater Chase Complications*
d20 Complication
1 A giant octopus joins the chase and chases after you.
2 You run into a patch of seaweed. Make a DC 10 Strength (Athletics) check. On a failure the seaweed counts as 10 feet of difficult terrain.
3 A sudden riptide grabs you. Make a DC 15 Strength (Athletics) check. On a failure you are pulled 15 feet in a random direction determined by the DM and suffer one level of exhaustion which lasts until the end of the chase.
4 A large piece of jagged drift wood pulled by a fast current speeds toward you. The wood makes an attack against you with a +5 bonus to the attack roll. On a hit you take 1d8 piercing damage.
5 A coral reef lies in your path. Make a DC 10 Dexterity (Athletics) check. On a failure you are hooked my the coral and take 1d4 piercing damage and lose 10 feet of movement.
6 A large swell or wave is headed your way. Make a DC 15 Strength (Athletics) check. On a failure you are pushed back 15 feet at the start of your turn.
7 A reef shark approaches you. Make a DC 15 Wisdom (Animal Handling) check. You make this check at disadvantage of you are not at maximum hit points. On a failure the shark chases after you.
8 A school of jelly fish is in your path. You can spend 10 feet of movement to move around the jellyfish or make a DC 15 Dexterity (Athletics) check. On a failure you take 2d6 poison damage and lose 15 feet of movement.
9 A rock lies in your path. Make a DC 10 Strength (Athletics) check. On a failure you lose 5 feet of movement and take 1d10 bludgeoning damage.
10 A you are assaulted by currents in all directions and a small whirlpool forms beneath you. Make a DC 15 Strength (Athletics) check. On a failure you lose 10 feet of movement and suffer one level of exhaustion.
11 – 20 No complication.

*Note you may make a vehicles (water) check with the appropriate ability in place of an Athletics check if riding in a water vehicle during the chase.

PDF

Would you like these chase complication tables in a PDF along with all the other fifth edition D&D chase complications I’ve designed for this blog? Grab them below.

Chase Complication Tables

Saltwater Chase Complications Table

Flying Chase Complications Table

If you don’t want to grab them now, but decide you want the PDFs at a future date, head on over to the Free Game Resources section of this site where the documents will live along with monstersmagic items, backgroundsD&D fifth edition rules modulesspellsadventures, and more created by yours truly.

If you like what you’re reading, please check out my podcasts on The Tome Show, follow me on Twitter, tell your friends and share this blog post, and/or leave me a comment and let me know you think. Thanks!

One of my favorite adventure story tropes is people outrunning something huge and terrifying. Indiana Jones and that raging river in the Temple of Doom, the Catching Fire kids and that deadly mist, and almost any action movie with an explosion in it are perfect examples of this trope at work. Some of my favorite D&D sessions have ended with PCs running through narrow dungeon passages as some hazard like a wave of acid or crumbling ceiling chases right behind them. I’m aware that it’s impossible to outrun an explosion in the real world. So is casting magic missile.

Since I love this trope so much, I’ve created a few rules for how I use them in my games and I thought I’d give them to you! Check them out below.

Outrun Hazards

Outrun hazards are moving bodies of hazardous materials (like acid rivers or poison gas) which travel through enclosed spaces (like dungeons) and bear down on the characters. It helps if you have a map and minis to track the encounter when using outrun hazards.

Map. You’re going to need some sort of gridded or hexed map to help you keep track of the outrun hazard, especially if the encounter takes place in tight, winding tunnels. A map you can draw on is preferable, but if you can’t draw on the map use poker chips, tokens, or dice to help you track the hazard along the map. All of the other factors of your hazard can be tweaked based on the map you pick.

Tokens or Minis. You’ll need these to track the positions of PCs and other creatures on the map as they attempt to outrun the hazard.

There are a few common traits all outrun hazards have.

  1. Trigger. All outrun hazards have a trigger which makes them start moving. This could be anything from the lighting of a fuse to the breaking of a dam wall.
  2. Point of Origin. All outrun hazards have a point of origin. This point can be as small as a 5-foot square or as large as the entire edge of a map.  This is the space in which the hazard begins its run and should appear once triggered.
  3. Height. All outrun hazards have a height which should be noted at the start and can change as the hazards moves. (Note: If you want a direct flow outrun hazard to remain effective in a place with many wide open spaces, it’s fine to give it a height of “infinite” so running through wide spaces won’t suddenly eliminate its effectiveness. Not only that, it makes your life easier since you don’t have to track the height of the hazard. More on that below.)
  4. Flow. Flow describes the direction in which the outrun hazard moves. The various types of flow are listed below.
    • Direct. From the point of origin, this hazard moves in one direction as a straight line. When the hazard moves into an area wider than its current width, the hazard’s width changes to match that area’s width. For every 5 feet wider the hazard gets, it loses 1 foot from its height. For instance if a 10-foot-high, 50-foot-wide river of acid moves into a 60-foot-wide hall, it becomes a 8-foot-high, 60-foot-wide river of acid. If an outrun hazard moves into a space so wide it reduces its height to 0 feet, the hazard ceases to move and is not effective in that new space. When the hazard moves into a space narrower than its current width, the hazard’s width changes to match that area’s new width. For every 5 feet narrower the hazard gets, it gains 1 foot to its height. For instance if a 10-foot-high, 50-foot-wide river of acid moves into a 40-foot-wide hall, it becomes a 12-foot-high, 40-foot-wide river of acid. An indoor hazard can only grow to a height which the ceiling allows. (Note: If you want your outrun hazard to remain effective in a place with many wide open spaces, it’s ok to give it a height of “infinite” so running through wide spaces won’t suddenly eliminate its effectiveness. Not only that, it makes your life easier because you don’t have to track the height.) When an outrun hazard with a direct flow runs into a wall it begins moving in a new direction. If there is only one way for it to move after hitting the wall, it moves in the only direction it can. If after hitting the wall it can move in more than one direction, the hazard divides into equal parts and retains its height. So if a 10-foot-high, 50-foot-wide river of acid runs into a wall and can move in two directions, it becomes two rivers of acid each 10 feet high and 25 feet wide flowing in their respective new directions.
    • Explosive. Outrun hazards with explosive flows usually move quickly and dissipate even faster. These hazards move outwards from their point of origin in all directions as a sphere. Essentially they are a sphere with a growing radius. When these hazards hit a wall they stop moving in that direction, but continue moving in all other directions.
    • Infinite. Outrun hazards with an infinite flow usually move slowly, but can get into almost any space and take a long time to dissipate. An infinite flow hazard acts a direct flow hazard, except that it travels in all directions, not just a single direction, and it does not lose or gain height when it enters an area of a new width. It simply continues to move in all directions as its confines allow. Once an infinite flow hazard reaches an open, outdoor area, it stops moving in that direction.
  5. Initiative. All outrun hazards an initiative modifier and roll initiative as normal. During its turn an outrun hazard can only move. It cannot take actions or reactions.
  6. Speed. The speed at which the outrun hazard moves as described by its flow.
  7. Surge. On the hazard’s turn roll a d6. If the result is greater or equal to the hazard’s Surge value, the hazard moves twice its speed this turn.
  8. Effect. This the effect the outrun hazard has on a creature when it is within the hazard.
  9. Terminal Conditions. Eventually the outrun hazard runs out of steam. This entry describes how this occurs and what the lasting effects of the hazard on its environment are.

Sample Outrun Hazards

Here are a few sample outrun hazards. Feel free to tweak them as needed for your dungeons or campaigns.

Acid River

A bright green river erupts from the wall in a burst of pressure, sizzling the stones and objects in its way.

Trigger. There is a huge lake of acid held behind a dam of adamantine in the Underdark. Configuring levers in the right sequence allows for the dam to be opened and the acid to be released.

Point of Origin. A line 50 feet wide and 5 feet long.

Starting Height. 20 feet

Flow. Direct. The river of acid moves and grows in a direction opposite the lake.

Initiative. +1

Speed. 70 ft.

Surge. 5

Effect. A creature who gets caught by, moves into, or starts its turn in the river takes 22 (4d10) acid damage and must succeed on a DC 15 Strength saving throw or become restrained while in the river and move the with the river as it flows. As an action the creature can repeat this saving throw on its turn to try and escape the river. The creature has disadvantage on this saving throw if the height of the acid river is greater than the creature’s height.

With a successful DC 15 Strength (Athletics) check a creature can swim against the flow of the river.

Terminal Conditions. After 5 minutes, the lake has been emptied and the river stops moving. Any unattended objects in the complex susceptible to acid damage in the path of the river are completely destroyed. Small puddles of acid remain on the floor of the complex where the river flowed. Any creature which falls prone on this path takes 5 (1d10) acid damage.

Fiery Explosion

The glass column of elemental energy explodes in a tremendous, fiery burst.

Trigger. Dealing 100 damage to a huge, reinforced, glass column containing the raw elemental energy of fire.

Point of Origin. The column, which is in a cylinder with a 5-foot radius

Starting Height. 20 feet

Flow. Explosive

Initiative. +3

Speed. 90 ft.

Surge. 6

Effect. A creature who gets caught by, moves into, or starts its turn in the explosion takes 33 (6d10) fire damage and must succeed on a DC 15 Strength saving throw or fall prone.

Terminal Conditions. The explosion last 3 rounds and then ends. Unattended flammable objects within the radius of the explosion are completely destroyed.

Insanity Mist

A cloud of purple mist shaping itself to look several grinning, laughing faces emerges from a vent in the floor and begins filling up the complex.

Trigger. The mind-flayer villain wears an amulet around its neck. Upon its death the amulet releases the mist from the vents.

Point of Origin. The 5-foot square of the vent

Starting Height. 5 feet

Flow. Infinite

Initiative. +0

Speed. 50 ft.

Surge. 5

Effect. A non-aberration creature who gets caught by, moves into, or starts its turn in the mist must succeed on a DC 15 Wisdom saving throw or gain a form of short-term madness. If the creature fails this saving throw within the mists while it has a form of short-term madness, it then also gains a form of long-term madness. If it fails this throw within the mists while it has a form of long-term madness, it gains a form of indefinite madness.

Terminal Conditions. The mists linger indefinitely in the complex and can only be removed by a strong wind blowing throughout the complex for an hour. A strong wind can clear out a single room in the complex in 1d4 minutes provided the room is sealed from the rest of the complex.

Lava River

Lava pour forth from the mouths of the massive stone heads on the walls, creating a river of the stuff headed right for you.

Trigger. An ancient red dragon’s death triggers this hazard in its volcanic lair.

Point of Origin. A line 100 feet wide and 10 feet long

Starting Height. 50 feet

Flow. Direct. The river of lava moves away from the stone heads on the wall.

Initiative. +1

Speed. 60 ft.

Surge. 5

Effect. A creature who gets caught by, moves into, or starts its turn in the river takes 33 (6d10) fire damage and must succeed on a DC 15 Strength saving throw or become restrained while in the river and move the with the river as it flows. As an action the creature can repeat this saving throw on its turn to try and escape the river. The creature has disadvantage on this saving throw if the height of the river is greater than the creature’s height.

With a successful DC 20 Strength (Athletics) check a creature can swim against the flow of the river.

Terminal Conditions. After 5 minutes, the lava stops flowing. Any unattended objects in the complex susceptible to fire damage in the path of the river are completely destroyed. The molten lava remains in the complex though now it is simply a placid lake of the stuff which never cools and is 5 feet deep. Any creature which enters or starts its turn in this lava lake takes 22 (4d10) fire damage.

Raging River

The dam breaks, unleashing a torrent of water upon you.

Trigger. A shoddily made dam holds back a small lake. The dam can be broken open as an action with a successful DC 15 Strength check.

Point of Origin. A line 20 feet wide and 5 feet long

Starting Height. 10 feet

Flow. Direct. The river flows away from the lake.

Initiative. +1

Speed. 70 ft.

Surge. 5

Effect. A creature who gets caught by, moves into, or starts its turn in the river must succeed on a DC 15 Strength saving throw or become restrained while in the river and move the with the river as it flows. As an action the creature can repeat this saving throw on its turn to try and escape the river. The creature has disadvantage on this saving throw if the height of the river is greater than the creature’s height. Whenever the river flows and the creature moves with it, that creature takes 11 (2d10) bludgeoning damage from getting banged against walls and other objects.

With a successful DC 15 Strength (Athletics) check a creature can swim against the flow of the river.

Terminal Conditions. After 1 minute the lake has no more water and the river stops flowing.

Lighting Explosion

The glass column of elemental energy explodes in a tremendous burst of blue lightning.

Trigger. Dealing 100 damage to a huge, reinforced, glass column containing the raw elemental energy of lightning.

Point of Origin. The column, which is in a cylinder with a 5-foot radius

Starting Height. 20 feet

Flow. Explosive

Initiative. +3

Speed. 90 ft.

Surge. 6

Effect. A creature who gets caught by, moves into, or starts its turn in the explosion takes 33 (6d10) lightning damage and must succeed on a DC 15 Constitution saving throw or become restrained for as long as it remains in the explosion. The creature can repeat this saving throw on its turn as an action, ending the restrained condition on a success.

Terminal Conditions. The explosion last 3 rounds and then ends. Unattended flammable objects within the radius of the explosion are completely destroyed.

Poison Mist

The statue of the dragon’s head breathes a sickly green gas into the air and an enormous cloud begins to form and take over the complex.

Trigger. A lever on the wall next to the dragon’s head.

Point of Origin. A 20-foot-radius sphere of gas

Starting Height. 20 feet (see Point of Origin)

Flow. Infinite

Initiative. +0

Speed. 50 feet

Surge. 5

Effect. A creature who gets caught by, moves into, or starts its turn in the mist takes 44 (8d10) poison damage and must succeed on a DC 15 Constitution saving throw or become blinded for 1 minute.

Terminal Conditions. The mist lingers in the complex in 1d10 days. It can only be removed before that by a strong wind blowing throughout the complex for an hour. A strong wind can clear out a single room in the complex in 1d4 minutes provided the room is sealed from the rest of the complex.

Spice It Up

Obviously the examples listed here can be tweaked and modified to fit you specific dungeon needs. One quick way to make these outrun hazards even more exciting is to introduce chase complication tables and extra dash actions from the Dungeon Master’s Guide into the encounter.

PDF

For your convenience I put the rules and sample outrun hazards in a free PDF for you in the link below.

Outrun Hazards

This document will live forever on the Free Game Resources section of this site so if you ever need it again, go there to find it alongside magic itemsmonstersD&D fifth edition rules modulesbackgroundsspellsadventures, and more.

Playtest

This idea is still in-progress, so please let me know what you think in the comments below.

If you like what you’re reading, please check out my podcasts on The Tome Show, follow me on Twitter, tell your friends and share this blog post, and/or leave me a comment and let me know you think. Thanks!

I recently wrote an article titled “Give Chase,” for the fabulous EN World EN5ider magazine from ENWorld.org. The team over there is great and it was a ton of fun collaborating with their editor James Haeck.

The article I wrote is about running a successful chase sequence. The chase rules in the fifth edition Dungeon Master’s Guide are inspiring. My article has tips, tricks, and brand new complication tables you can add to your chases.

So to commemorate my first official published credit in a paid publication and to encourage you to go check out the magazine, I’m posting some complication tables different from the ones in the article. Read below or in the Free Game Resources section of this site for Sewer Chase Complication Table and the Treetop City Chase Complication Table. Of course if you want the Underground Chase Complication Table caves or Castle Ground Chase Complications Table, you’re going to need to buy the article.

One of my favorite chase scenes.

Tables

Sewer Chase Complication Table
d20 Complication
1 A roaring river of sewage blocks your path. Make a DC 15 Strength (Athletics) check. On a failed check, the sewage counts as 10 feet of difficult terrain.
2 Disorienting echoes cause you to question your current path. Make a DC 10 Wisdom (Perception) check. On a failed chec, you move in a random direction determined by the DM.
3 A pipe opens next to you releasing a spray of sewage. Make a DC 15 Dexterity saving throw. On a failed save, you are knocked prone by the sewage.
4 You disturb a nest of rats. A swarm of rats chases after you.
5 Ahead of you a mechanical iron portcullis begins to shut. Make a DC 15 Dexterity (Acrobatics) check or use 10 feet of movement to go around a different way. On a failed check, you take 1d4 bludgeoning damage and have to use 10 feet of movement to go around a different way.
6 You must cross over the top of a pipe opening. Make a DC 10 Strength (Athletics) check to jump over. On a failed check, you fall 1d4 x 5 feet (taking the normal 1d6 bludgeoning damage per 10 feet) and land prone.
7 You run through a cloud of noxious fumes. Make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. On a failed save, you are poisoned until the end of your next turn.
8 An ochre jelly falls from the ceiling and attacks you.
9 You must cross a pool knee-deep sewage. Make a DC 10 Strength (Athletics) check. On a failed check, the sewage counts as 10 feet of difficult terrain.
10 You run through a pocket of explosive gas. If you are carrying a lit torch, candle, lantern, or other fire-powered light source, open flame, or create fire by magic or mundane means this round, make a Dexterity saving throw. On a failed save, you take 2d6 fire damage.
11 – 20 No complication.
Treetop City Chase Complication Table
d20 Complication
1 You cross an unstable rope bridge. Make a DC 10 Dexterity (Acrobatics) check or fall prone on the bridge.
2 You cross a crumbling bridge. Make a DC 10 Dexterity saving throw. On a failed save, you fall 1d3 x 10 feet (taking the normal 1d6 bludgeoning damage per 10 feet) and land prone.
3 You run across a narrow bridge. Make a DC 15 Dexterity (Acrobatics) check. On a failed check, you fall 1d3 x 10 feet (taking the normal 1d6 bludgeoning damage per 10 feet) and land prone.
4 The bridge before you is broken. Make a DC 15 Strength (Athletics) check to jump the distance. On a failed check, you fall 1d3 x 10 feet (taking the normal 1d6 bludgeoning damage per 10 feet) and land prone.
5 You disturb a hive of hornets. A flying swarm of insects chases after you.
6 You have reached the end of your path on this level and there is nowhere for you to go but up. Make a DC 15 Strength (Athletics) check to climb up to a new level. On a failed check, the effort to climb costs you 10 feet of movement.
7 You accidentally knock over an irate druid. Make a DC 15 Charisma (Persuasion) check or she chases after you.
8 A large puddle of tree sap is in your path. Make a DC 10 Dexterity (Acrobatics) check to avoid it. On a failed check, the sticky grounds costs you 5 feet of movement.
9 A large gap between structures blocks your path. You can make a DC 15 Dexterity (Acrobatics) check to swing across the gap on a vine or use 10 feet of movement to walk around the gap. On a failed check, you fall 1d3 x 10 feet (taking the normal 1d6 bludgeoning damage per 10 feet) and land prone.
10 An overgrowth of razorvine blocks your path. Make a DC 10 Strength (Athletics) check to jump over it. On a failed check, you take 1d10 slashing damage and lose 5 feet of movement.
11 – 20 No complication.

PDFin’

Do you want these chase complications to have and hold and keep and love forever in PDF form? Great news, people! Check out the links below to grab the chase tables or if you want to pick them up later, they will live indefinitely on the Free Game Resources section of this site.

Chase Complication Tables

Sewer Chase Complication Table

Treetop City Chase Complication Table

If you like what you’re reading, please check out my podcasts on The Tome Show, follow me on Twitter, tell your friends and share this blog post, and/or leave me a comment and let me know you think. Thanks!